We help patients beat cancer with tumor-localized therapy

Unlocking the potential of click chemistry

About Shasqi

Shasqi is leading the development of therapeutics leveraging click chemistry to get active cancer treatments to tumors with its proprietary CAPAC™ (Click Activated Protodrugs Against Cancer) platform. The technology is based on localizing a click chemistry reagent in the tumor area, which then activates a second agent, a systemically infused protodrug. When the two ‘click’, a powerful localized therapy is activated at the tumor, while keeping its systemic exposure levels below toxic thresholds. We have already proven that our platform works in humans, which opens up an array of future possibilities for click-chemistry based therapies.

Overview of the CAPAC platform development

  • 2001

    The term click chemistry is coined by Kolb, Finn and Sharpless: a highly selective set of chemical reactions that can occur even in a glass of water.

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  • 2004

    Prescher, Dube, and Bertozzi report the use of click chemistry to modify cells in living animals.

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  • 2008

    Blackman, Royzen, and Fox pioneer the tetrazine ligation, an exceptionally powerful and efficient type of click chemistry.

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  • 2014

    Shasqi’s founder presents the foundational concepts of the Click Activated Protodrugs Against Cancer (CAPAC) Platform and shows the concept works in mice using the tetrazine ligation.

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  • 2016

    Shasqi shows that a cancer drug improved with the CAPAC Platform can lead to fewer side effects and better efficacy against tumors in mice.

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  • 2019

    Shasqi Announces Series A Financing.

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  • 2020

    FDA and Australian Ethics Committee provide permission to proceed with first in human clinical study.

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  • 2020

    Shasqi presents anti-tumor responses for SQ3370, CAPAC’s lead candidate, in preclinical cancer model. (AACR)

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  • 2020

    The first patient dosed with Shasqi's SQ3370. First ever use of click chemistry in humans.

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